©: 2015-2019 Creative Platform Contemporary Art Association

Razvan Botis

Born in Brasov, Romania in 1984, lives and works in Cluj. Razvan Botis received a BFA and MFA from Academy of Arts and Design Ion Andreescu.

 

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Pil and Galia Kollectiv

Pil and Galia Kollectiv are London based artists, writers and curators working in collaboration. Their work explores the legacy of the
avant-garde in the changing context of creative work and instrumentalised leisure. They are interested in the relationship between art and politics and the role irony and belief play in its current articulation. Their band WE extends the role of music in their artwork, as well as their interrogation of the construction of individuality and collectivity. They are also the directors of artist run project space xero, kline & coma in London. They have a joint PhD. in fine art from Goldsmiths College and work as lecturers in Fine Art at the university of Reading and senior lecturers at the Cass School of Art.

 

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Victor Man

Victor Man was born in 1974 in Cluj, Romania, where he continues to live and work. Man uses a variety of media including painting, drawing, sculpture and print. He draws most of his source material from the media, isolating it from its original context to create withdrawn images and forms in muted shades of grey that operate through a sense of déjà vu, radiating forth like malevolent icons. Man often installs his works in small arrangements that suggest fragmented accounts of violence and perversion. Through a series of foretelling clues, they convey evidence of a grim truth that resists any straightforward interpretation. Throughout Man’s work, elements of Romanian folklore and Eastern European history appear in residual form, disconnected from their narrative basis only to form singular archetypes, distilled from memories lost.

 

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Serban Savu (b. 1978, Sighisoara, Romania; lives in Cluj, Romania). Savu paints the image of a world after the failure of a historical project, along with his vision of “the New Man” – the long-awaited product of the communist society, created in the ideological lab – caught in the melancholy of his daily condition of anonymity in the transition to capitalism. In Savu's works the distance between an ideal perspective and that of reality loads each painting with an awkward, unavoidable tension.

 

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Serban Savu

Mircea Suciu

Mircea Suciu (b. 1978, Romania) received his BFA from Cluj Visual Arts University in Painting, Cluj Napoca, Romania (2003).
 

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Ciprian Muresan

Born in communist Romania in 1977, Mureşan was 12 during the Revolution of 1989, when the Eastern Bloc collapsed; he came of age in the ensuing period of “catch-up modernization,” which heralded Romania’s shaky transition to capitalism. The last two decades, spent in Cluj, where he lives and works, have fostered in him both a sense of disillusionment with his country’s institutionalized systems of misinformation and a healthy sense of irony.

 

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Adrian Ghenie

Adrian Ghenie (b. 1977, Baia Mare, Romania) graduated in 2001 from the University of Art and Design, Cluj, Romania. He lives and
works in Cluj and Berlin.

 

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Zsolt Berszán

Works and lives in Csiksomlyo (Sumuleu Ciuc) and Kolozsvar (Cluj Napoca), Romania

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István Betuker

He was born in 1984 in Satu Mare, Romania. Lives and works in Cluj, Romania

 

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Szabolcs Veres

Szabolcs Veres was born in 1983, Satu Mare, Romania and lives and works in Cluj-Napoca, Romania. He has participated in exhibitions at the MODEM Centre for Modern and Contemporary Art and the National Museum of Contemporary Art (MNAC), Bucharest, Romania and is expected to receive his PhD in painting from the University of Arts and Design Cluj-Napoca, Romania in 2011.

 

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Vlad Nanca

Vlad Nanca (1979) lives and works in Bucharest, Romania. In parallel with his early art practice Vlad Nanca was an active participant in the coagulation of the young artist scene in Bucharest, Romania. In 2003 he was one of the founding members of 2020 initiative, under which among other events, he hosted the Home Gallery (with exhibitions by Liliana Basarab, Ioana Nemes, Mona Vatamanu and Florin Tudor, Janek Simon, etc), started the “incepem” emailing list and the “incepem” fanzine. His early works employ political and cultural symbols, often using word-play to evoke nostalgia and referencing Romania’s recent history and challenging the social and political climate, but Nanca’s recent interests evolve around (public) space and its use and functions, materializing in sculptures, objects and installations.

 

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Radu Comșa

He was born in 1975, lives and works in Cluj Napoca The idea of “painting overall”, or “expanded painting”, provides a key to understanding what direction is Radu Comșa trying to lead us through. Incorporating divagations, extractions, references, Radu Comșa’s “transcriptions” (from one material to another, from one shape to another, from one conceptual frame to another) are referring to the art object as a form of intellectual replica of the artist’s own design of thoughts. His diagrammatic transcriptions (plates of cast concrete or panels of sewn fabrics which are informed by his interest in modernist architecture, concrete poetry, and atonal music) operate as visual morphemes expected to collide and further release extra meaning.

 

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Simion Cernica was born in Bucharest, Romania. In 2011 he re-located to Los Angeles, where he currently lives and works.

As an artist who purposely avoided the conservative and stagnant reality of attending art school in Romania in the 90s, he created his own personal method of studying contemporary art and the related phenomena. Initially he focused on photography, painting, video/film, installation and performance but currently works with whatever medium and discourse necessary to express his conceptual position and formal exploration. He develops his practice by researching the current socio-political and cultural energies, recent history and the layered 20th century history. While questioning our approved cultural perspectives, he is devoted to creating a specific and complex art language that is continuously adjusted, aiming to challenge the way we perceive our reality, cultural history and advance our precarious humanity.

 

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Simion Cernica

Marieta Chirulescu

Marieta Chirulescu’s work is the result of an ongoing preoccupation with the aesthetic and conceptual contingencies of the painted canvas. The abstractions for which she is best known reference the formalism of Color Field painting, superimposed with the array of digital printing methods available to the public today. Drawing from an extensive archive of imagery, Chirulescu uses scans, screen shots and the technical irregularities that occur throughout digital processes to alter personal photographs as well as those taken by her father during the Romanian dictatorship. Breaking down and erasing the images through a process of rigorous technological reproduction and manipulation, she is left with the sediments and traces of the original pictures. Although Chirulescu eliminates most of the identifiable referents within her compositions, her pieces retain the rectilinear frame that conditions our way of seeing and understanding the world: the grid present in windows, mirrors, houses or books, which invariably invades the canvas. The subjects of her work are not the protagonists of the real world, but rather the afterimages and echoes of the “mechanical unconscious”, of scanners and copy machines. Chirulescu arranges and rearranges scraps of visual information to produce images that disrupt, question and speculate on the inherent nature and function of painting, while also inviting reflection on the process of their own making.

 

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Daniela Palimariu

Daniela Palimariu was born in 1986, Iasi. She is currently live in Bucharest, Romania. In the last few years, her art practice has evolved towards public/private social events and livable objects and installations that understate the ambiguity of human relations, the need for personal space, play and daily subversions. She presented various works at Sandwich, tranzit.ro, Ivan Gallery, MNAC, Salonul de Proiecte and Platforma Space (Bucharest), MAGMA (St. George), Kinema Ikon (Arad), Intermediae (Madrid, ES), CAZ (Penzance, UK), and was an artist in residence at residency.ch (CH), The Model (IRL), Nida Art Colony (LT) and EstNordEst (Quebec, CA).  In 2016, together with other artists, she opened Sandwich, an atypical artspace in Bucharest. Since 2012 she also coordinates salonvideo, an ongoing, flexible platform for presenting video art in Romania.

 

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Irina Dora Magurean is an artist from Cluj, Rumania, working in the field of photography. She has a PhD in Fine Arts and teaches at the Photography and Video Department from the University of Art and Design, Cluj. Irina is a member of Fabrica de Pensule.

 

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Irina Dora Magurean

Teodora Axente

Teodora Axente’s (b. 1984) painting is a lot of scenography, the construction of images starts from either classical poses, or, in most cases from unusual and strange situations, constructed by the artist herself. The characters painted in a manner that sends you to the seventeenth century classics are “accessorized” with various modern materials, such as tinfoil or plastic wrap. It is as if we are in a fantastic dressing room, placed in an uncertain time, and Teodora Axente’s characters are disguised in outfits that are more or less fancy, in a note often playful.

 

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The Neo-Romantic painting of Robert Fekete (b. 1987), that had as starting point a contemporary reinterpretation of Caspar David Friedrich’s painting, began to gain pop accents in the last two years. The pictures with characters that gaze meditatively at nature posters seem to be made of collages or appear to be intensely colored pieces of stained glass. His characters are synthetic now, they are not described in detail and the image has become almost flat, the artist’s interest manifesting especially in the research of artistic language.

 

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Robert Fekete

Gabriela Vanga

Gabriela Vanga was born in 1977 in Romania. She lives and works in Paris. Vanga’s multi-disciplinary practice includes photography, video, painting, performance and installation – the media is chosen in order to fulfill the conceptual demands of a given work. Often Vanga’s work is aiming at unfolding our perception and understanding of perception of identity, fact and fiction. At the core of her work is a wish to challenges us and to make us reconsider and rethink, what we believe to be true, and what we know to be real. 

 

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Andreea-Lorena Butincu

Andreea-Lorena Butincu dissects and re-configures the traditional notions of painting, using the colored paste as a subject in itself. By blurring out the boundary between painting and object, her works often allude to an art history that she reveals as marked by flatness, smoothness, as if birthed by the refusal to dig into cloth and fed by the illusion of depth. The intention of the artist is to skin the painting off the canvas by an archaeological gesture, digging into the smoothness of the painted surface. According to this practice, the production and the representation of painting oscillates between the skin of the work- the colored paste peeled off – and bare, raw surface – the frame of the painting.

 

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Cristian Raduta

Cristian Raduta was born in 1982 in Bucharest (RO). He lives and works in Bucharest. He completed his studies at the National University of Arts, Bucharest (RO) in 2005. He receives a Master’s degree in 2007. In 2006 he receives the Vasile Pârvan scholarship offered by the Accademia di Romania in Roma (IT) that ends in 2008. In 2013 he obtains a Ph.D. in sculpture at the National University of Arts, Bucharest (RO) where he is currently one of the professors of the Sculpture Department. 

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In his current work deals with picturing different shapes characterized with human, and mostly masculine properties; it is a project about form that explores portraying objects with anthropomorphic attributes. He believe that when creating and depicting vases and such containers there is an unconscious or instinctual way that the creator of such objects embodies them with gender in spite of the fact that gender is a social construct. These very qualities made me interested in the ‘gender of objects’ and how this classification changes our perceptions of it. By emphasizing specific, already existing attributes, he was able to entrust the object with customized human characteristics. These discarded scales of human properties often suggest a gender and by the use of common connotation the audience will make their own judgment of the portrayed abstract figures. The labour in the project can be found in the selection of materials and shapes to be used. These are deliberate and include a research of their historical use, and its current functional and material value. Most relevant elements have been appropriated from fashion design, automotive design, sports equipment and pottery.
The 'problem' and the exciting part in the project can be found in the communication of the idea. The selection of the elements might be well developed, although its reconstruction has been done in an intuitive style resulting in an obscene and often childish language.
Tools of concept formation and cognitive learning were used during the process of making; the works present a number of ‘signs’ to create an image and for the viewer to find a self-initiated explanation of the artwork. When the mind makes a generalized assumption of the work, it extracts similarities from numerous examples and by this process simplifies the observed object. This process enables the audience to subtract the work to a few shapes, words or feelings allowing the formation of concept.

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Adrian Kiss

Apparatus 22 is a transdisciplinary art collective founded in January 2011 by current members Erika Olea, Maria Farcas, Dragos Olea together with IoanaNemes (1979 - 2011) in Bucharest, Romania. Beginning with 2015 they are working between Bucharest and Brussels. They see themselves as a collective of dreamers, researchers, poetic activists and (failed) futurologists interested in exploring the intricate relationships between economy, politics, gender studies, social movements, religion and fashion in order to understand contemporary society. A recent topic of research and reflection in Apparatus 22 practice is SUPRAINFINIT universe: a world-making attempt to use hope critically in navigating present and future. In their very diverse works - installations, performances, text based-shapes, reality is mixed with fiction and storytelling and all merge with a critical approach drawing knowledge & experience from design, sociology, literature and economics.

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Apparatus 22

Flaviu Rogojan was born in 1990. He lives and works in Cluj-Napoca. He is studying for a masters degree at the Art and Design University Cluj-Napoca. Previous exhibitions include Carrot and Stick at Baril, Fabrica de Pensule, Cluj-Napoca (November 2012); R255 G0 B255 at Fabrica de Pensule, Cluj-Napoca, (January 2012); Portal at Galeria Casa Matei, Cluj-Napoca (May 2011). He is an active member in

the Art Students Association.

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Flaviu Rogojan

The Bureau of Melodramatic Research

The Bureau of Melodramatic Research is a dependent institution which actualizes itself through social and political realities, always facing the implosion of the possibility for panacea-art today. BMR examines the way in which key elements of melodrama are currently at work on the political scene. 

Irina Gheorghe and Alina Popa founded BMR in 2009 and are contributing to several collective projects, such as ArtLeaks, Presidential Candidacy, Bezna zine.
 

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Matei Bejenaru (born 1963) is an artist and founder of Periferic Biennial in Iasi, Romania. As an artist, in his documentary photographs, video and public performances, he examines the politics of representation in documentary photography and film and methods of generation of hybrid art projects at the confluence between visual arts, poetry, experimental music and scientifc research. He is teaching photography and video at "George Enescu" Arts University in Iasi. Matei Bejenaru collaborates with Anca Poterasu Gallery in Bucharest.

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Matei Bejenaru